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Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings.

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Rover, Mar 16, 2013.

  1. Rover

    Rover Member

    Why do we "dicker" over the price? Early traders,in furs for example, found it easier and more convenient to buy in lots of 10 .In Latin "decuria" means a set of ten.
     
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  3. Derc

    Derc New Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    Interesting Rover, never heard of "dickering" first time I've deeked the word.
     
  4. jackdaly

    jackdaly Member

    Re: Why you say it.


    Have heard of Bickering as a mild on going argument or Bickering as a discussion over a price agreement.
     
  5. Derc

    Derc New Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    Yes Jack, I've heard of bickering, maybe it's a Yorkshire slant on the word. I wonder if "on yer bike" put an end to the quarrel.
     
  6. jackdaly

    jackdaly Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    If neighbours were quarrelling my Mother used to say they were "Fratching" ?.
     
  7. Croggy

    Croggy Cereal Forumer Staff Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    Yes, that's another dialect word for an argument or quarrel.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fratch?s=t says
     
  8. Croggy

    Croggy Cereal Forumer Staff Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    My dad always used to say 'are you laiking out' as in playing a game, or going out. Laik (or lake) is from old Norse 'leiken'.
     
  9. leedsman1954

    leedsman1954 Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    Never heard of "dickering"!
     
  10. Janey D

    Janey D New Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    Its a common occurence in our house....my husband is from Hastings, my married surname is DICKER, and YES I get asked to repeat it every time Im asked for my details!!!
    There are villages down south named after the family but Ive no idea why its called `Dickering`....altough after watching my husband try to make a quick decision.........:rolleyes:
     
  11. jackdaly

    jackdaly Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    Saw rite love...... No harm done
    Yer all rite. ... Don't bother I have enough thank you (McDonald. Ad. on T.V.)
    You or rite Love..... Question, How are you or just another way of saying Hello.

    Leeds Area.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  12. drfeelgood69

    drfeelgood69 New Member

    Re: Why you say it.

    As kids, when we went to call for our friends, we'd ask them "are you lekking out?"

    You couldn't say "are you playing?" because that would be the same as asking "do you want to have sex?", which would ensure the beatings and the name calling would last a long time!

    What it was to be an 8 year old!
     
  13. Derc

    Derc New Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    We didn't layke with girls much as they couldn't climb trees or throw stones very well, but I remember being a patient for a few girl doctors, the 'hospital' was a derelict house.
    At 8 year old, girls are not the innocent cherubs their fathers think they are. :hey:
     
  14. Rover

    Rover Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    I used to Laike out. I never heard of the reference to "having sex." Anyone recall "chumping". This related to collecting anything combustible for Nov.5th. When I think about the beautiful old furniture that was thrown on the bon-fires celebrating VE & VJ day
     
  15. bewerley

    bewerley New Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    I passed my 11 plus but the only question I didn't understand was at the top of the page ,after you filled in your name,it simply asked 'sex'; luckily a braver pupil than I put up his hand to ask what it meant. The invigilator simply muttered 'just put boy' by his tone we all knew we had hit upon something.

    My father oft used an expression 'as hard as the hobs in hell' to describe anything such as stale bread for instance. Never heard of it since. I never heard the F word until the mid sixties or the word 'boobs' until the 70s
     
  16. jackdaly

    jackdaly Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    I came back from 9 years living in Spain to the expressions "Giving her one"
    This and similar sentences had always been meaning sharing e.g. Teacher to class " Johnny has two apples and then Johnny gives me one" Nowadays the answer would probably "Johnny has two apples and Teacher can have both of them if Johnny can give her one"
     
  17. jackdaly

    jackdaly Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    When Bread was Rationed my Grandmother always said "Old Bread toasts the best" so we would not ask for the fresher Loaf. (We were so hungry during the second World War it did not really matter.
     
  18. Derc

    Derc New Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    My Gran was also my mentor during my early days, she was brought up in a convent and detested nuns, "to high heaven". most of her expletives were of a religious nature eg;
    "my sainted aunt" "may the devil take the hindmost" the one I did't understand until years later was, "the devil s***s on the highest pile".
     
  19. whoopsadaisy

    whoopsadaisy New Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    I always say to my grandson 'come and have a bup of my tea' meaning take a sip. My parents used this expression but I never hear it nowadays.
     
  20. Croggy

    Croggy Cereal Forumer Staff Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    I've never heard of that one.

    There are other uses of 'bup' on twitter etc according to urban dictionary, but I've never come across them either.
     
  21. Derc

    Derc New Member

    Re: Why you say it. Phrases and words we use without knowing their meanings

    To go bupping was to go boozing as I recollect.
     

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